Posts Tagged With: home safety

Backyard ‘Staycation’ Safety Tips


Summer brings more opportunities for outdoor activities around the house.  Why not plan a “staycation” in your own backyard; but play it safe:

  • Keep your grill on a level surface away from your house, garage and any flammable objects.
  • Don’t step away from a grill while it’s on, and keep children and pets at a safe distance from the flames.
  • When using charcoal, extinguish properly by breaking up the embers with a long stick or grilling tool, then covering the grill to cut off the oxygen.  Or, slowly sprinkle the coals with water.  Once the coals are cooled completely, dispose of them in a metal container.

 

 

  • Before mowing, clear the yard of any loose objects that could fly out from under the lawnmower.
  • When using power tools for yard work, wear protective gear and cover your eyes with goggles.
  • Wear protective clothing when using pesticides etc and don’t spray around children or pets and precisely follow directions.
  • Before you dig a hole in your yard for any reason call your local utility company to avoid underground gas or power lines.

 

  • Install four foot high fence around the pool area and include self-closing gates with latches out of reach of children.
  • Keep the pool area clear of toys and other objects that someone may trip over.
  • Never allow children to swim without adult supervision.
  • Place a sturdy pool cover over the pool when it’s not in use.

 

  • Place swing sets and other play equipment on level ground, and make sure legs are properly
    anchored.
  • Inspect play sets regularly for any sharp bolts, screws, nails or rot.
  • When celebrating with fireworks, wear safety glasses when handling fireworks, and have water handy to soak spent fireworks before disposing of them.

Be careful of becoming over-exposed to the sun.  Drink plenty of fluids, and seek air conditioning if you become overheated, and have fun!

Ideas taken from: https://www.horacemann.com/insurance/property-insurance/summer-backyard-safety-tips
Categories: family, holiday, Home Safety, Home Tips, Organize, Real Estate | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Surprising Home Fire Hazards


On average, more than 300,000 house fires occur each year in the U.S. — and most of them are preventable.  Make sure to check your smoke alarms and familiarize yourself with the fire hazards around your home — especially these surprising ones:

  • Dust bunnies: If dust collects near electrical sockets and floor heaters, just one spark can cause a fire. Sweep or download (1)vacuum your floors regularly to prevent buildup. Pay close attention to hard-to-reach areas, such as behind doors or around entertainment systems.
  • Clothes dryers: Cleaning the lint trap should be part of your regular laundry routine. Left dryer_vent_cleaninguntouched, lint can build up in your dryer duct with every load of laundry. Have a professional inspect and clean your dryer at least once a year to help eliminate a fire hazard.
  • pink-glass-vase-of-pink-tulips-in-window-jessica-holden-photographyGlassware: When sunlight passes through some kinds of glassware, the concentrated ray can ignite flammable materials such as stacks of papers. Play it safe by moving all glass accessories, including vases, away from windows.
  • Loose batteries: Nine-volt batteries, which power smoke detectors, are designed with both posts on the top.img-9-volt-battery-fire-danger Bits of metal, including other batteries and loose change, can create a bridge between the posts that causes a heat-creating charge. To prevent this, keep unused batteries in their original packaging and cover the posts of expired batteries with black electrical tape before properly disposing of them.

The information in this article was obtained from various sources. While we believe it to be reliable and accurate, we do not warrant the accuracy or reliability of the information.

Categories: family, Fire Safety, Home Safety, Home Tips, Real Estate | Tags: , , , , , | 5 Comments

A Few Safety Gadgets to Consider for Your Home


smokedetectorYou’d do just about anything to protect your family and your home.  Take a look at these safety devices that make it easier to get some peace of mind.

  • See who’s there. Traditional peepholes are difficult to see through, making it easier for unannounced—and potentially unsavory—visitors to get you to open your door. LCD peephole viewers attach over existing peepholes and let residents view their visitors on screens that are about the size of a digital camera’s. Features can include wide angle and zoom modes, low-light visibility and image recording capability.
  • Turn on the TV (light). Timed lights that come on at the same time each night may not fool burglars, but the flickering light of a television might. Rather than leaving your TV on when you’re away from home, look into LED TV simulator units. These small devices use less energy than a TV but emit lights that flicker and change color and intensity, giving the appearance from outside the house that a TV is on—and that someone is home.
  • Stop the flow. When a sump pump overflows or a washing machine hose fails, you could be out thousands of dollars in repair bills. Instead, a wireless water leak alarm can alert you to a leak before it becomes a whole-house disaster. When they detect a leak, these devices send out a loud alarm. For added protection, install a whole house alarm that will automatically shut off the entire water supply if a leak is detected.
  • Listen to your detector. You may think no one could sleep through the shrill alarm of a smoke detector, but your children might not wake up. An American Academy of Pediatrics study found that just 58 percent of children awoke to the sound of a smoke alarm within five minutes—but half woke within 20 seconds of hearing their parent’s voice. “Talking” smoke and carbon monoxide detectors let parents record a message telling the child to wake up and what to do next.
  • Unclog the vent. Over time, lint from the dryer accumulates in the exhaust vent, creating clogged conditions that can lead to a fire. Though annual cleanings of your exhaust vent are always recommended, a pressure system sensor can let you know when a lint clog is inhibiting air movement. These systems send out an alarm when air movement is seriously restricted in the vent, potentially giving you time to prevent a fire before it’s too late.
The information in this article was obtained from various sources. While I believe it to be reliable and accurate, I do not warrant the accuracy or reliability of the information. These suggestions are not a complete list of every loss control measure.
Categories: Home Tips, Real Estate | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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